Video drives huge dwell time online (case study)


The average time that a user spends on a single page on the internet is 43 seconds, according to ComScore. That of course lumps all of the impressions that last only a few seconds in together with the impressions that last for several minutes, and comes up with an internet average. The trouble is, there are billions and billions of page impressions that do only last a few seconds, which I would argue are virtually worthless to a brand – I call these the journey impressions … the ones that a user uses to get to the content that they are actually looking for.

The real sweet spot then for a brand, in my opinion, is to buy as few of these ‘journey’ impressions as possible and look for the ‘destination’ impressions, where users spend a far greater amount of time. Telegraph.co.uk is a site that invests significantly in engaging content to make our pages more ‘sticky’ and that is borne out by ComScore, who say that the average time spent on a single page on Telegraph.co.uk is 66 seconds – 23 seconds longer than the internet average.

What’s more interesting still, is that if you look at all pages that have video on them, in each of our channels, and work out an average time spent per page on those pages then it is at least 120 seconds per page and up to 150 seconds per page, depending on the channel. If you take just the top 80% of videos in each channel to calculate average dwell time per page, dwell time rockets to nearer 250 seconds per page!

It makes sense when you think about it. Video is the most engaging format available to both journalists and brands alike, and if you incorporate professional, interesting and relevant video content into your online proposition, you’re going to drive longer dwell times. Our short form content enables us to double the dwell time per page from other pages on our site, and triple the internet average. It would seem to follow though that sites such as Sky and Channel 4, that have longer form content, have even longer dwell times.

We’ve seen many, many campaigns where it is not only the video creative that is driving a higher percentage of clicks, but also the standard display that is placed around our video content that out-performs the same creative that is appearing on our site but on non-video pages.

So the great news for marketers is that not only is video the most persuasive medium open to you, but the presence of video slows the user down for long enough to engage with your brand.

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One response to “Video drives huge dwell time online (case study)

  1. Pingback: A short post about long form « BBH Labs

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